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Roadmap

This describes the processes used to gather qualitative and quantitative data elements and observations necessary to evaluate effective STEM schools/programs.

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The Exploratory Model describes a regular school experience, with STEM-related EXTRACURRICULAR opportunities offered to students in addition to the regular school day. These experiences may include, but are not limited to: after school clubs, summer programs, science fairs, robotics clubs and video production clubs.

One to Six Months Prior

  • Secure administrative permission to host a club/program
  • Identify Club/ Program leader
  • Identify specific program content/objectives/activities to be offered
  • Plan an extensive professional development program for program teachers and support personnel that includes content and pedagogy in project-based instruction and STEM implementation
  • Establish budget and program time line
  • Establish targeted participants (primary, intermediate, K-6), and the number of participants the club/program can serve based on budget, facilities and number of projected staff
  • Establish a location (classroom, lab, after school room, cafeteria)
  • Plan for one field trip/business connection (can include having a guest speaker(s). Include requests for transportation to and from, if necessary
  • Plan for one family engagement event
  • Design a registration form/permission slip for participants. Include all parent permissions/contact/ and emergency information.

One Month Prior

  • Advertise: club/program information, dates, targeted audience, fees (if applicable), where program will be offered (location), objectives and outcomes
  • Open registration for participants
  • Depending on number of registered participants, determine if additional support staff will be necessary, and secure support staff
  • Order all materials and supplies for projected registration numbers.
  • Confirm dates/ agendas for field trip and family connection events including transportation if necessary.

One Week Prior

  • Confirm registration roster
  • Prepare location logistics, materials, and supplies (delivery and storage)
  • Confirm objectives and program agenda. Confirm duration of planned instructional time and activities.
  • Confirm transportation logistics if you are including a field trip
  • If using any technology in the program, make sure connections are establish and presentation materials are working (computers, projectors, skype, simulations, etc.)

Day of Program

  • Prepare and stage learning areas and activity centers, including technology
  • Check in participants
  • Assign groups/supervisory personnel
  • Go over agenda/timeline and goals with group
  • Have FUN!

The Introductory Model describes a regular school day, with STEM-related experiences offered in addition to the current curriculum. These experiences may include, but are not limited to: integrated STEM units delivered once the state testing is complete, supplementary stand-alone learning units offered through industry or non-profit partnerships, etc.

One to Six Months Prior

  • Meet with site/district Administrator to discuss STEM unit integration into the existing school/district curriculum
  • Develop program mission, vision and goals
  • Identify highly qualified teacher leaders in one or more subject areas, at one grade level, at a single site, or in a district-wide grade band that will be offering the STEM unit.
  • Identify specific STEM program content / objectives / activities to be offered (i.e. a two-three week STEM unit in a 4th grade classroom, a district-wide STEM recycling contest for 5th grade)
  • Plan an extensive professional development program for all teachers and support personnel that includes content and pedagogy in project-based instruction and STEM implementation
  • Establish budget and STEM unit time line
  • Establish a supportive system of assessments and program evaluation- can include rubrics for student scoring, surveys, and efficacy studies
  • Plan for one field trip/business connection (can include having a guest speaker(s). Include requests for transportation to and from, if necessary
  • Plan for one family engagement event

One Month Prior

  • Identify where program will be offered (single school location, or district wide in one grade level)
  • Confirm objectives and outcomes
  • Confirm participants / students / grade level
  • Depending on number of participants, determine if additional support staff will be necessary, and secure support staff
  • Order all materials and supplies for projected participant numbers.
  • Confirm dates/ agendas for field trip and family connection events including transportation if necessary.

One Week Prior

  • Confirm unit/lesson plans and end of program assessments and evaluation.
  • Prepare location (traditional classroom, science lab, outdoor area) logistics, materials, and supplies (delivery and storage)
  • Confirm objectives and program agenda. Confirm duration of planned instructional time and activities.
  • Confirm transportation logistics if you are including a field trip
  • If using any technology in the program, make sure connections are established and presentation materials are working (computers, projectors, skype, simulations, etc.)
  • Prepare and stage learning areas, labs and activity centers, including technology
  • Include strategies for parent/community outreach involvement

The Partial Immersion Model describes a non-traditional school day where STEM-related experiences are integrated into the curriculum. These experiences may include, but are not limited to: teaching to a school-wide STEM theme, teaching year-long integrated Problem/Project-Based Learning Units, teaching dual-enrollment programs, teaching in a “school within a school” model, etc.

Guiding Questions

Identify the focus of your goals as a school/district/community

  • What is the impetus for economic growth and development, and/or quality of life in the community in which you live?
  • If you were to outline the strengths and weaknesses of your community, what would those be?
  • What are your greatest opportunities for job growth, i.e. agriculture, mining, high tech, housing/construction?
  • Generate ideas for an educational STEM program(s) that will provide support and collaboration with the businesses and resources you have in your community.  Examples of programs include; engineering, agri-science, biotechnology, sustainability, electronics, bio-medical, solar power, mining
  • Identify your “graduate profile”.  What do you want your students “to know and be able to do” when they exit your program? What will be the number of students involved and target grade levels for instruction

Stakeholder Team

Once a STEM content focus has been identified, establish a team of stakeholders to participate in leadership team, design team and advisory board.  Recruiting representatives from businesses, Higher Education, district employees, parents and students will be helpful in the early stages to identify vision, mission and philosophy for the STEM program. Cast a wide net to gather input from all.

  • Identify what resources, if any, the community already possesses (i.e. content, materials, technology, school/business partnerships, structural/ building resources).
  • Identify a time line for development.  This can include a preliminary brainstorming session with focus groups.  (All stakeholders having input)

Design Team

Establish sub-working groups from the stakeholder group to:

  • Identify the STEM program targeted audience (middle school, honors program, English Language Learners, special needs) and level of implementation.
  • Identify content resources that are currently available and those that will need to be developed.  Design the curriculum, scope and sequence, and assessments/evaluation of the program before you design the learning environment.  Knowing “what” you are teaching precludes knowing what facilities you will need to facilitate the instruction.  Identify, design and create units/objectives that support higher order thinking skills, inter-disciplinary cross-curricular content, research practices, and rigorous, authentic workplace competency skills. Review existing curricula (i.e. NASA, GLOBE, Project Lead the Way, U of A Jr. Biotech program)
  • Identify what materials will be used to facilitate instruction (computers, books, lab equipment)
  • Identify the modality of STEM instruction-auditory (lecture), visual (including various forms of technology/digital learning), kinesthetic /hands-on, etc.
  • Identify the instruction focus, i.e. the integration of science and mathematics only, or the implementation of all four STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematic) areas.  Additional program models include the Arts and Humanities for a STEAM-based approach.
  • Identify adequate instructional time
  • Identify the pedagogy, i.e. inquiry based, project/problem based, collaborative learning, independent study.
  • Identify and integrate 21st Century work place competency skills that are necessary to promote a knowledge-based economy within your community.
  • Identify processes to provide equal access for all students

Curriculum Team

Establish sub-working groups from the stakeholder group to:

  • Identify the number and types of credit  (classes) each student may earn by participating in the program.  For example, a middle school might offer STEM electives or provide integrated classes in mathematics and science.
  • Identify necessary personnel resources. Do you need to hire new teachers or maximize potential teachers already at a school? Determine the number of highly qualified academic teachers, specialist teachers, and support staff.  Research types of certification and highly qualified status each teacher would need to teach the courses.
  • Establish an extensive professional development plan for all faculty and support staff. Establish professional learning communities (PLC’s) with staff and administration with a focus on student achievement.
  • Plan an extensive professional development program for all teachers and support personnel that includes content and pedagogy in project-based instruction and STEM implementation
  • Identify technology tools and resources.
  • Identify necessary structural resources/school site identification. Can you teach the program in an existing school, or would a new building/ addition need to be designed?  What structural resources would be necessary to promote flexibility, adaptability, and growth within the program? If using an existing structure, what modifications, if any, would need to occur to the building/classrooms/ office spaces?  If designing a new structure identify where construction will occur and find an architect.  Total Team Approach is best if building from the ground up.

Budget and Resources Tasks

  • Start a preliminary budget based on the implementation model you have created.  Establishing three layers of budgets (sky’s the limit, functioning, and acceptable) will help pinpoint what is necessary, and what is not. Identify potential funding sources, i.e. grants, district funds, community partnerships, donations, etc.
  • Establish beginning ties to resources in the community (i.e. business leaders, focus groups, advisory boards, STEM advocates, mentors, shadowing experiences, internships).
  • Establish School/Family partnership plan
  • Establish parameters for program evaluation.  Pre-post program/course evaluations, can include; focus group discussions among instructors, external consultants/evaluators, academic gains (grades, state/national assessments/efficacy surveys), and input from the community.  Identify strategies for student recruitment and retention.
  • Prepare and present scope of project/program to School Board for approval
  • Prepare Marketing Plan (include both recruitment and retention strategies)
  • (If necessary) Start project design and bid process, plan review and building permits, detail expected construction timeline and project expected opening date.

The Full Immersion Model describes a non-traditional school where STEM-related experiences determine the school’s curriculum. Full Immersion schools look more like 21st Century workplace environments rather than 20th century K-12 school environments. Problem-based learning drives the curriculum and instruction. Students continually collaborate to solve authentic problems, propose solutions and contribute ideas to the larger community.

Guiding Questions

Identify the focus of your goals as a school/district/community

  • What is the impetus for economic growth and development, and/or quality of life in the community in which you live?
  • If you were to outline the strengths and weaknesses of your community, what would those be?
  • What are your greatest opportunities for job growth, i.e. agriculture, mining, high tech, housing/construction?
  • Generate ideas for an educational STEM program(s) that will provide support and collaboration with the businesses and resources you have in your community.  Examples of programs include; engineering, agri-science, biotechnology, sustainability, electronics, bio-medical, solar power, mining
  • Identify your “graduate profile”.  What do you want your students “to know and be able to do” when they exit your program? What will be the number of students involved and target grade levels for instruction

Stakeholder Team

Once a STEM content focus has been identified, establish a team of stakeholders to participate in leadership team, design team and advisory board.  Recruiting representatives from businesses, Higher Education, district employees, parents and students will be helpful in the early stages to identify vision, mission and philosophy for the STEM program. Cast a wide net to gather input from all.

  • Identify what resources, if any, the community already possesses (i.e. content, materials, technology, school/business partnerships, structural/ building resources).
  • Identify a timeline for development.  This can include a preliminary brainstorming session with focus groups.  (All stakeholders having input)
  • Identify strategies for creating a school culture that encourages learning and innovation

Design Team

Establish sub-working groups from the stakeholder group to:

  • Identify the STEM program targeted audience (middle school, honors program, English Language Learners, special needs) and level of implementation.
  • Identify content resources that are currently available and those that will need to be developed.  Design the curriculum, scope and sequence, and assessments / evaluation of the program before you design the learning environment.  Knowing “what” you are teaching will drive decisions about what facilities you will need for the instruction.  Identify, design and create units/objectives that support higher order thinking skills, inter-disciplinary cross-curricular content, research practices, and rigorous, authentic workplace competency skills. Review existing curricula (i.e. NASA, GLOBE, Project Lead the Way, U of A Jr. Biotech program)
  • Identify what materials will be used to facilitate instruction (computers, books, lab equipment)
  • Identify the modality of STEM instruction-auditory (lecture), visual (including various forms of technology/digital learning), kinesthetic /hands-on, etc.
  • Identify the instruction focus, i.e. the integration of science and mathematics only, or the implementation of all four STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematic) areas.  Additional program models include the Arts and Humanities for a STEAM-based approach.
  • Identify adequate instructional time
  • Identify the pedagogy, i.e. inquiry based, project/problem based, collaborative learning, independent study.
  • Identify and integrate 21st Century work place competency skills that are necessary to promote a knowledge-based economy within your community.
  • Identify processes to provide equal access for all students

Curriculum Team

Establish sub-working groups from the stakeholder group to:

  • Identify the number and types of credit  (classes) each student may earn by participating in the program.  For example, a middle school might offer STEM electives or provide integrated classes in mathematics and science.
  • Identify necessary personnel resources. Do you need to hire new teachers or maximize potential teachers already at a school? Determine the number of highly qualified academic teachers, specialist teachers, and support staff.  Research types of certification and highly qualified status each teacher would need to teach the courses.
  • Establish an extensive professional development plan for all faculty and support staff. Establish professional learning communities (PLC’s) with staff and administration with a focus on student achievement.
  • Plan an extensive professional development program for all teachers and support personnel that includes content and pedagogy in project-based instruction and STEM implementation
  • Identify technology tools and resources.
  • Identify necessary structural resources/school site identification. Can you teach the program in an existing school, or would a new building/ addition need to be designed?  What structural resources would be necessary to promote flexibility, adaptability, and growth within the program? If using an existing structure, what modifications, if any, would need to occur to the building/classrooms/ office spaces?  If designing a new structure identify where construction will occur and find an architect.  Total Team Approach is best if building from the ground up.

Budget and Resources Tasks

  • Start a preliminary budget based on the implementation model you have created.  Establishing three layers of budgets (sky’s the limit, functioning, and acceptable) will help pinpoint what is necessary and what is not. Identify potential funding sources, i.e. grants, district funds, community partnerships, donations, etc.
  • Establish beginning ties to resources in the community (i.e. business leaders, focus groups, advisory boards, STEM advocates, mentors, shadowing experiences, internships).
  • Establish School/Family partnership plan
  • Establish parameters for program evaluation.  Pre-post program/course evaluations can include: focus group discussions among instructors, external consultants/evaluators, academic gains (grades, state/national assessments/efficacy surveys), and input from the community.  Identify strategies for student recruitment and retention.
  • Prepare and present scope of project/program to School Board for approval
  • Prepare Marketing Plan (include both recruitment and retention strategies)
  • (If necessary) Start project design and bid process, plan review and building permits, detail expected construction timeline and project expected opening date.

 

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